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M-M-R® II

MMR

M-M-R® II is used for primary vaccination and revaccination of children and adults to protect against measles, mumps and rubella.

Rotarix®

Rotavirus

Rotarix® is used for primary vaccination of infants to protect from rotavirus infection. The first dose is given between six and 14 weeks of age.

Varivax®

Varicella

Varivax® is used for primary vaccination of children from 12 months of age and adults to protect against varicella-zoster infection (chickenpox). The vaccine may prevent or reduce the severity of chickenpox disease if it is given within 3-5 days of exposure to someone with the disease.

Varilrix®

Varicella

Varilrix® is used for primary vaccination of infants from nine months of age, children and adults to protect against varicella-zoster infection (chickenpox). The vaccine may prevent or reduce the severity of chickenpox disease if it is given within 3-5 days of exposure to someone with the disease.

Varilrix® is back in stock and available to order from 3 March 2014.

How long do I delay getting pregnant after immunisation?

Answer: 

Weakened live vaccines, e.g. meales/mumps/rubella (MMR) and chickenpox vaccines, are not intentionally given during pregnancy because there is a theoretical risk that a live vaccine could affect the fetus. Although research in the US, Germany and the UK found no injury to the unborn child when the MMR vaccine was inadvertently given just before or during pregnancy women are advised to delay becoming pregnant for one month after having a live vaccine.

There is no need to delay pregnancy after receiving non-live/inactive vaccines, e.g. influenza, tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis, hepatitis B, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines.

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