HPV

HPV vaccine for Aussie schoolboys

Thursday, 12 July 2012

The Austalian National Immunisation Programme will include the human papillomavirus vaccine (Gardasil®) for 12 and 13 year old boys from 2013.

Boys in year 9 will also be eligible for the vaccine through a school-based catch-up programme. The vaccine covers two types of human papillomavirus (HPV) that cause genital warts and two types that can cause chronic HPV infection and increase the risk of penile, anal and oropharyngeal cancers in men.

Australia has recorded a decrease pre-cancerous cervical changes in women since the introduction of the vaccine and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee recommended the immunisation programme be extended to include the vaccine for boys  following a review of its cost effectiveness.

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Decrease in genital wart cases

Monday, 11 June 2012

New Zealand is seeing the same decreasing trend in the number of new genital warts cases since the Gardasil vaccine was introduced as Australia experienced after introducing the vaccine in July 2007.

The Institute of Environmental Science & Research Limited (ESR) monitors the voluntary provision of sexually transmitted infection data and prepares an annual report examining infection trends over time.

The Sexually transmitted infections in New Zealand 2011 Surveillance Report identified decreasing numbers of new genital warts cases between 2008 and 2011. The decreased numbers were most notable in 2010 and 2011 and in females aged 15-19 years. This decrease corresponds with commencement of the HPV immunisation programme (Gardasil) in June 2008. The report is available in full from the ESR Public Health Surveillance website.

Research comparing the number of new cases of genital warts in females who have received the Gardasil vaccine compared with females who have not would provide additional evidence to support this trend.

If the New Zealand continues to follow Australia’s trend for decreasing cases of genital warts, young heterosexual men will also have a significant decrease in new cases through reduced exposure to the infections in young women in the following years.

Figure: Genital warts case numbers in sexual health clinics by District Health Board, 2006-2011. ESR Surveillance Report, Sexually transmitted infections in New Zealand 2011, page 55.

 

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Gardasil®

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

Gardasil® is funded for use for primary immunisation of girls from 12 years of age and young women to protect them from four types of human papillomavirus infection. Gardasil® is not funded but can be used for primary immunisation of females who are not eligible for funded vaccine and within the age group of 9 through 45 years and males aged 9 through 26 years to protect them from four types of human papillomavirus infection.

The Institute of Environmental Science & Research Limited (ESR)Sexually transmitted infections in New Zealand 2011 Surveillance Report identified decreasing numbers of new genital warts cases between 2008 and 2011, most notable in 2010 and 2011 and in females aged 15-19 years, corresponding with commencement of the HPV immunisation programme. The Genital Warts pages from the full report are available here. The full ESR report is available from the ESR Public Health Surveillance website.

A short YouTube DVD, The Story of HPV (Human Papillomavirus), provides information for women, parents and caregivers, health workers and students planning to work in the health sector about the human papillomavirus, the Gardasil® vaccine that helps to protect against HPV, and the importance of cervical screening and practising safer sex in protecting women's health.

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